Recovery After Arthroscopy knee surgery


Knee after arthroscopy surgery


Arthroscopy knee surgery is the surgical procedure of choice for removal of loose bodies (cartilage/bone) from the joint space. Arthroscopies are more successful after traumatic knee injuries than for arthritic developments.

With one in four cases of knee arthroscopy going on to further surgery, including knee replacement, it's important to get the best from this procedure. In some cases, further surgery may be unavoidable, but you can optimise the benefits of the arthroscopic debridement by getting back full range of movement as soon as possible after the surgery. 


For Best Results, Limping MUST Be avoided After Arthroscopy Knee Surgery


The knee joints suffer massive forces of wear and tear that can be added to through faulty gait patterns. Yes, that means limping! To make sure your knee doesn't continue to deteriorate after arthroscopy it's all about getting the range of joint motion back and getting you walking properly. Walking is the best medicine for knees, but not if you're walking badly!


Structure of knee sinovial joint

The opposing bony surfaces of the knee joint are protected by a cartilage buffer that has a shiny friction-free consistency of dense plastic


It's important to remember with all the large weight-bearing joints we must operate with the optimum amount of fluid in the joint, so that we walk on a 'cushion of fluid'.

The synovial fluid lubricates the joint and helps promote friction-free gliding of the opposing cartilage surfaces past one another. If you walk badly, there's more friction from the cartilage caused by the wonky muscle action, which inflames the knee. More fluid then pours into the joint to help filter out little gritty bits of cartilage, with the accumulating swelling causing pain. It's important to empty it out again so that you have just the right amount of fluid in the knee. 



SYNOVIAL FLUID OF THE KNEE PERFORMS SEVERAL IMPORTANT FUNCTIONS


1. It lubricates the knee

2. It cools the opposing working cartilage surfaces cool

3. It debrides the knee of gritty cartilage particles

4. It nourishes the cartilage buffer

5. It acts like a cushion of fluid to soften bone-to-bone contact in the knee



The knee joint

Using the thigh (quadriceps) muscles properly gives you proper hydraulic cushioning when you weight bear through the knee


When weight-bearing through the knee, it's essential for the knee to brace back fully to prevent bone-against-bone contact within the joint. Using the quadriceps muscles in the thigh invokes strong hydraulic forces through the knee fluid (contained within the joint capsule) that spring the joint surfaces apart. Bracing pressurises the fluid and provides the critically important off-loading to spare any grinding of the cartilage. By contrast, walking on a collapsed bent knee means you wear the cartilage buffer away. Within weeks, if not days, you can erode down through to the cartilage bed. 



THE VASTUS MEDIALIS MUSCLE OF THE INNER THIGH PERFORMS SEVERAL CRITICALLY IMPORTANT FUNCTIONS AT THE KNEE


1. It straightens the knee through the last 15 degrees

2. It swivels the lower leg bone (tibia) into the semi-circular knee cartilages . .

3. To lock the leg for easy weight-bearing

4. It pressurises knee fluid & defrays compression by constricting the capsule

5. It pumps excess fluid out of the knee 




Bracing the leg straight is brought about by the vastus medialis muscle of the inner side of your thigh. It straightens the knee through its last 15 degrees until it locks and you can stand on the leg with minimal effort. If the knee stays swollen after surgery - apart from being more painful - it will be more difficult to straighten. Failing to walk properly on the knee after arthroscopy may ultimately cause the procedure to fail. 


Learn All About It Before your Surgery 

Buy Your Arthroscopy Knee Surgery Recovery Regime Video here


VIEWING THIS VIDEO BEFOREHAND TAKES YOU CAREFULLY THROUGH
WHAT YOU WILL DO WHEN YOU WAKE AFTER SURGERY


1. Waking in Recovery Room and what you can do

2. Starting to get the leg working

3. Moving the foot first helps move the knee

4. Getting upright and weight bearing

5. The important points about taking the first steps



Read more about Sarah Key's Knee Surgery Recovery Video 

Read more about Preventing Knee Arthritis

Read more about Knee Problems

Read about Knee Replacement

See the page of Dr Nick Vertzyas, the Sydney hip and knee surgeon



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